The City College of New York

The series of lectures, conversations, film showings, exhibitions, and courses brings together faculty, students, and staff at CCNY and the New York City community to examine human rights through multiple lenses.

 


Wednesday, February 4, 2015
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. 
The City College of New York
Shepard Hall, Room 250
At 137th, between Amsterdam and Broadway

Take 1 trains to 137th Street and walk up 137th Street, the NAC is the modern building on the hill after crossing Amsterdam; or, A, C, B, D to 145th and walk south on Convent Avenue. Shepard Hall is the gothic-inspired building on the corner of 140th Street and Convent Avenue.

The Latin American Role in Human Rights," with Professor Kathryn Sikkink and Professor Margaret Crahan, moderated by Eric Weitz

       Kathryn Sikkink

Kathryn Sikkink is the Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Sikkink works on international norms and institutions, transnational advocacy networks, the impact of human rights law and policies, and transitional justice.  Her publications include The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions are Changing World Politics (awarded the Robert F. Kennedy Center Book Award, and the WOLA/Duke University Award); Mixed Signals: U.S. Human Rights Policy and Latin AmericaActivists Beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics (co-authored with Margaret Keck and awarded the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas for Improving World Order, and the ISA Chadwick Alger Award for Best Book in the area of International Organizations); and The Persistent Power of Human Rights: From Commitment to Compliance, (co-edited with Thomas Risse and Stephen Ropp).  She holds an MA and Ph.D. from Columbia University.  Sikkink has been a Fulbright Scholar in Argentina and a Guggenheim fellow. She is a member of the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the editorial board of the International Studies Quarterly, International Organization, and the American Political Science Review.

 

    Margaret E. Crahan

    Margaret E. Crahan

Dr. Margaret E. Crahan is a Senior Research Scholar and Director of the Cuba Program at the Institute for Latin American Studies at Columbia University.   Until September 2009 she was the Kozmetsky Distinguished Professor and Director of the Kozmetsky Center of Excellence in Global Finance at St. Edward’s University. From 1982-1994 she was the Henry R. Luce Professor of Religion, Power and Political Process at Occidental College and from 1994-2008 the Dorothy Epstein Professor of the City University of New York. She is Vice President of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights and a member of the Boards of St. Edward’s University and the Latin American Program of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. In 2013 she was recognized by the government of Brazil for her work on human rights.  

Dr. Crahan has received grants from the Fulbright Program, Social Science Research Council, American Council of Learned Societies, Open Society Foundations, the Ford Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among others. She has participated in international missions to Bolivia, Chile, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. She has visited Cuba over 50 times since 1973 for research. Dr. Crahan has published over one hundred articles and books including Human Rights and Basic Needs in the Americas; Religion, Culture and Society: The Case of Cuba; The City and the World: New York’s Global Future and The Wars on Terrorism and Iraq: Human Rights, Unilateralism, and US Foreign Policy (with Thomas G. Weiss and John Goering).

    Eric D. Weitz

Eric D. Weitz is Dean of Humanities and Arts and Distinguished Professor of History at The City College of New York. He was previously on the faculty of the University of Minnesota, where he was Distinguished McKnight University Professor of History and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair in the College of Liberal Arts. Trained in modern European and German history, his work in recent years has extended to the history and politics of international human rights and crimes against humanity. He received his Ph.D. from Boston University in 1983.

As Dean of Humanities and Arts, Weitz has been building the faculty and identifying new resources for faculty research and creative activity. He has promoted interdisciplinary collaborations across the College, and has sponsored new programs for students that provide them with major educational experiences outside of New York City. One highlight is the cooperation with Stanford University, in which 10 of CCNY's best Humanities students engage in research projects over the summer with Stanford faculty mentors. The goal is to prepare them for doctoral programs in the Humanities and, ultimately, to help diversify the professoriate in the United States. In turn, CCNY provides teaching experience for advanced Stanford Ph.D. students.

Weitz has been the recipient of many fellowships and awards from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Council for Soviet and East European Research, and the American Council of Learned Societies, among others. He sits on the Academic Advisory Board of the Center for Contemporary Historical Research in Potsdam, Germany, and on the boards of many journals.

His major publications include Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy(2007; second expanded edition 2013),Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation(2003), and Creating German Communism, 1890-1990 (1997), all with Princeton University Press. Weimar Germany was named an "Editor's Choice" by The New York Times Book Review, and was included in the "Year in Books" of the Financial Times(London) and "The Best Books of 2007" of The Independent(London). It has been translated into Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Chinese. Most recently, he co-edited with Omer Bartov, Shatterzone of Empires: Coexistence and Violence in the German, Habsburg, Russian, and Ottoman Borderlands(Indiana University Press, 2013), the result of a multi-year, international, and interdisciplinary project. In all his work he combines political, social, and intellectual history.

Weitz is a frequent lecturer in public and academic settings, especially on the historical development of human rights and on comparative genocides. He has written and lectured on the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, and the genocide of the Herero and Nama of Namibia. In 2006 he initiated a book series with Princeton University Press, Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity. Weitz is currently writing A World Divided: A Global History of Nations and Human Rights from the Age of Revolution to the Present.


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